Ask Sawal

Discussion Forum
Notification Icon1
Write Answer Icon
Add Question Icon

can you hike kjerag?

6 Answer(s) Available
Answer # 1 #

Kjerag is a challenging climb and we had lots of questions around the practicalities of the hike and what it was like to stand on the infamous Kjeragbolten boulder. Now that we’ve done it, we wanted to share the benefits of our experience with you. Here’s our ultimate guide with everything you need to know about climbing Kjerag and standing on Kjeragbolten!

Click here to read about our Kjerag adventures!

Let’s get this straight: climbing Kjerag is difficult! It’s a 9km route with 3 steep ascents all mixed in with lots of climbing on rocks which can be really slippery if it rains. In total, there are around 600 metres of uphill hiking and, at times, it’s steep enough to need to use the guide chains which line the most challenging parts of the route.

Fitness:

I found the third and final climb a bit of a struggle as it seemed to keep giving and giving but overall the hike always felt manageable and I would consider myself to be of average fitness. My marathon running, fitness loving husband found the whole day a breeze!

The steepest parts of the climb are lined with guide chains:

Check out our stats from the day for more detailed information on the hike, timings and elevation:

Most of the route is clearly marked with stone piles which have prominent red T’s painted onto them. The markings are positioned closely enough so that the next marking is visible making it easy enough to find the way. There are also some very pretty signposts that provide reassurance of being on the right path!

Which way? This way!

We arrived in Oslo the morning before our Kjerag climb and made the 7 hour drive to Lysebotn on the same day. Our aim was to stay as close as possible to Kjerag as we wanted to start the hike bright and early the next morning. We opted to pitch our tent at Lysebotn Camping which is a 5 minute drive to the Kjerag car park. It was a little more expensive than other campsites we stayed at during our Norway road trip but the location was perfect and the views of Lysefjord were breathtaking.

We had planned to stay in Flørli 4444 Hostel, a beautiful hostel located right on the shores of Lysefjord with incredible views across the one of Norways most beautiful fjords. The hostel is only accessible by ferry and unfortunately the ferry had not started for the season when we visited so we never made it. This stunning hostel comes highly recommended and is not to be missed on a trip to Lysefjord – Check prices now!

Click here for the best places to stay at Kjerag

After we finished our Kjerag hike we drove to Stavanger and took the ferry to Tau* where we spent the night in Wathne Campsite. Tired, frozen and wet, we treated ourselves to a cabin to thaw out and dry off! The next morning it was a 30 minute drive to Preikestolen where we took on the stunning Pulpit Rock!

*1 day later and the Lysebotn to Songesand ferry was in operation. It runs during the peak tourist season and saves some driving.

A well deserved cabin after Kjerag!

Hiking Pulpit Rock is one of the must do Norway experiences, however the hike is very popular and can get very busy during peak periods. We recommend booking your accommodation well in advance and staying as close to the hike as possible to allow for an early morning or late evening hike to the summit.

Click here for the best places to stay at Pulpit Rock

I’m not the biggest fan of heights and I found Kjerag manageable. The return journey is more difficult as there are lots of steep downhill sections and I was glad to have my awesome hiking buddy to help me along. As soon as I saw the Kjeragbolten boulder I knew stepping out onto it wasn’t an option as I’d potentially get dizzy and take a tumble. Not recommended when 1,000 metre drops are involved!

Downhill views:

The inclines are intense!

What goes up must come down! The steepest climbs:

DON’T LOOK DOWN are probably the best words of advice we can offer! The boulder is accessed by edging around a small ledge and stepping out onto the rock. The step out onto the boulder does involve a small leap of faith but, if it wasn’t for the 1000 metre drop on one side, there would be plenty of room to maneuver!

The most difficult part of Kjeragbolten is stepping around the ledge onto the boulder. The rock itself is quite large and flat so there is a little wiggle room.  We’ve googled this and apparently there have been no falls from the boulder which added to our peace of mind.

Front view of the boulder:

The boulder from above:

Standing on the boulder:

Layers! The altitude makes for very changeable weather and temperatures and we experienced rain, snow, wind and blistering sunshine during our hike! Our gear included:

When it rains, it pours! All wrapped up:

Loving my pink layers!

There are no shops on the climb so bring enough food and drink supplies for the hike! We brought 1.5 litres of water and some sandwiches, crisps and energy bars. For hikes, I am the designated water carrier while Dave takes care of the camera equipment. I used a Camelbak rucksack which holds 1.5 litres of water and has a bite valve at the front to make for easy sharing between the two of us. I don’t even notice I’m carrying it most of the time which can only be a good thing!

Check prices on Amazon

We also brought our cameras and a GoPro to record the action – not forgetting lots of spare batteries and an extra memory card! We didn’t see very many hiking poles on the day we climbed but it did seem like they would be difficult to handle on the steepest parts of the route.

Check out the camera gear we use here

The hike starts from Øygardstøl which is a few minutes drive above Lysebotn. There’s ample parking, a hiking map, toilets, a small information centre and a cafe. We popped into the information centre to check on the hiking conditions and pay for our parking for the day (100 NOK). At the end of the hike we rewarded ourselves with an expensive diet coke in the cafe and soaked in the incredible views of Lysebotn.

Kjerag parking:

The Information Centre:

Route maps:

Check out the views from the cafe:

[5]
Edit
Query
Report
Lucy Arad
SCREEN REPAIRER CRUSHER
Answer # 2 #

Planning to do the Kjeragbolten hike and take one of the most incredible pics of your life? You’re on the right page 😉

Kjerag (the mountain) and Kjeragbolten (a 5 cubic metre boulder wedged in the mountain’s crevasse) have become very popular over recent years, especially because of social media.

Nowadays thousands of hikers, BASE jumpers, thrillseekers and Instagrammers alike from all over the world come to hike to Kjeragbolten and get the daredevil no-photoshopped picture.

Kjeragbolten is one of the most challenging yet spectacular hikes in Norway and provides unparalleled and breathtaking views of the 42Km-long Lysefjorden.

The climax of this hike is standing atop the Kjerag Boulder, a rock suspended above a 984-metre (3,228 ft) deep abyss.

As Kjerag is a popular BASE jumping site, if you’re lucky, you may be able to see BASE jumpers diving from cliffs and down to Lysefjord.

Kjerag is a mountain located in Sandnes municipality, in southern Norway. The closest town is Lysebotn, 100Km (59mi) away from Stavanger and 480Km (300mi) from the capital Oslo.

Driving from Oslo to Kjerag parking in Øygardstøl is a very long journey and takes approximately 9h.

If you’re in Oslo and want to hike to Kjeragbolten, the best option is to fly to Stavanger and then hire a car or take the available bus in the summer.

You can book your flights to Stavanger with Skyscanner, which is the website that I use and trust.

By Car

To get to Øygardstøl you can take the ferry to Lysebotn and continue by car, or drive via Sirdal (this road is closed in the winter from around October to May/June). Travel time: 2,5 hours each way.

By bus

There’s a bus from Stavanger to Kjerag (Øygardstøl) operated by Go Fjords. In 2022, it will run on Saturdays and Sundays from June 11th to August 28th, and every day in July.

The bus departs from Byterminalen track 6 at 7:45, arrives at the starting point at 10:15 and returns from Kjerag at 16:30.

The roundtrip ticket costs 690 NOK (US$ 83) for adults and 250 NOK (US$ 30) for children.

Kjerag Mountain is towering 1,020m (3,346 feet) above sea level.

The difference in altitude is 380 meters (1,246 feet).

Slippery and steep granite terrain with few gravel paths.

The trail is well-marked with signs and a T (trail) in red painted on many rocks along the path.

Øygardstøl Mountain Lodge, south of the Lysefjord, is the starting point of the hike.

There’s a café, restaurant, service facility with toilets and tourist information. The car parking fee is 300 NOK (US$ 36).

Kjeragbolten hike time is between 5h and 6h the entire journey. It depends on your fitness level, pace, the amount of snow on the mountain and also how many stops you make to admire the views and take pictures.

I did it in August and took me 1h50min to walk up to Kjerag boulder from the car parking in Øygardstøl.

The Kjeragbolten hike is challenging and recommended to experienced hikers and adults. Because of the steep drops, it isn’t suitable for small children.

The 9.8Km (6 mi) demanding trail will take you up and down hilly mountaintops, with 3 periods of steep climbing interspersed with 2 shallow valleys.

You’ll walk on a moon-like landscape, scramble over rocks, and pass through water streams, waterfalls, mud and even snow.

There are some chains attached to the ground to aid with stability and it also serves as trail markers.

You can hike up Kjerag Mountain from mid-May to mid-November, but the best time to do it is from June to September when the weather is more pleasant, and the trail isn’t covered in snow.

If you go during the off-season, you must book a Kjeragbolten hike tour. Note that the snow can cover the roads and trail until May.

You cannot hike to Kjerag in the winter, as the road is closed due to the snow conditions.

Lysebotn doesn’t get hot in the summer and the temperature range from 9 to 22C during this time of the year.

So, you should dress in layers, starting with tight/warm hiking pants and long sleeves, followed by a short, t-shirt and a jacket or lightweight fleece. Wind and waterproof outwear are also recommended.

You should also wear hiking shoes or walking boots and bring a backpack along with water bottles, food, a sun blocker, a small towel and some extra clothes in case you get wet.

Avoid wearing rubber-based / plastic-based materials and denim clothes because they can be uncomfortable.

The hike is free, but if you hire a guide, it will cost you approximately 120 euros, including transportation, hotel pickup, and drop-off.

* Note that only the bus to Kjerag is around 68 euros. So, I think it’s a good idea to join a guided hike to Kjerag and you can also select a fjord cruise.

Hiking up Kjerag Mountain is challenging, but worthwhile. You will be rewarded with astonishing panoramic views of the Lysefjord fjord and take one of the most incredible pictures of your life.

After spending one and a half day in Olso, I took a flight to Stavanger to start doing some of the best hikes in Norway.

After a 50min flight, a bus from the airport to Stavanger’s terminal, and a 15min walk I arrived at the hotel.

I just checked in, drooped off my stuff and went to explore the city a little bit.

There are many things to do in Stavanger, including a visit to the very charming old city, with whitewashed houses, dotted with plenty of flowers and cobblestone streets.

After a quick walk and some snaps, I went to the supermarket to get some groceries for the next day (cereal bars, nuts, a sandwich, juice and probably the most expensive mineral water I’ve ever gotten, almost US$ 4.00 each).

After leaving the supermarket I started wondering how expensive is to travel in Norway. I heard that Norway is one of the priciest countries in Europe…

On the next day, I took the bus from Stavanger to Kjerag.

As soon as we left the city, I could appreciate the beautiful Norwegian countryside. The weather was cloudy but pleasant.

The drive was telling us a little bit about the local life. He also said they had a lot of snow, in some places up to 2 to 3m, and in the mountains up to 10m of snow, that year.

So, I was imagining that the fjords would be covered with snow, which for me would make it even more picturesque.

The ride took three hours and 15 minutes, and at 10:45 we arrived at Øygardstøl, the start point of the Kjeragbolten hike.

The hike was not easy!!

It starts with a steep climb up the cliffs from 640m above sea level to 825m. This is the steepest and most challenging part.

The path then follows a track up and over a new ridge before coming down into a valley.

The trail is full of ups and downs, and there are so many rocks, that sometimes I wondered if I were walking on the moon…

The chains attached to the ground help a lot with footing, pulling yourself up and sliding down.

One of the most exciting parts was when I walked to the edge of the mountain and could see the fjord. What a breathtaking view!

I’ll never forget when I stepped on the fjord’s edge for the first time.

It was so high, so high that I was scared of falling, but at the same time, the adrenaline motivated me to be there for a while.

A mix of feelings that is very hard to explain… I just opened a smile like an innocent child in an awe-inspiring moment.

Of course, I could not miss the opportunity to register it.

Once I was on the top of the plateau, there were just a few small climbs and descents, before getting to Kjeragbolten.

After 1:50 hiking, I arrived at Kjerag boulder.

The final 10m was covered with snow, and I even warned people who were taking pictures and said that it was more dangerous than on the top of the rock itself.

As soon as I got in line to take my picture, I heard from an Italian lady: “Ma che paura.” (I’m so scared.). As I replied, her boyfriend warned her to not look down.

I can confess that before I stepped on the suspended rock, I looked down and got some butterflies in my stomach because it was around 1000m high.

However, when I was on the top of Kjeragbolten I was so self-confident that even did a tree pose (a yoga pose in which one stands with just one foot, putting the other foot on your knee and your hands together facing each other up to one’s head).

The weather changed a lot that day, partly cloudy, mostly sunny and foggy.

The view of the fjord was unbelievably beautiful!! Three waterfalls, snow and the fjord’s “lake” pictured magnificent scenery!

I was surprised by this scenery because I had seen only pictures of people on the top of the rock, but I wouldn’t imagine all those waterfalls. Kjeragfossen waterfall is one of the tallest waterfalls in the world.

I couldn’t resist and sat down on the edge again to contemplate the stunning view and take some pictures.

After the lunch break and getting some rest, it was time to take the way back, and I did that with the Italian couple.

We went back admiring the landscape, taking pictures, drinking clear water direct from the fountain, and talking about some of our trips.

At 4:45 the bus departed for Stavanger.

When I arrived, I took a shower, had dinner and went to get some groceries for the next day.

Stavanger is a small city, with a lake in the city centre.

Something about this city reminded me of Switzerland, and I’m almost sure that was not only the prices…

Safe travels and have fun in Norway.

More posts that might interest you:

I always recommend that you buy travel insurance! It can literally be your lifeline if something happens to you, or if your luggage is lost or stolen.

I always use World Nomads, travel insurance for independent travellers. It’s easy to buy, extend & claim online, even after you’ve left home.

Play safe and get yours here.

I stayed at Scandic Stavanger City and it was very nice.

If you’re looking for accommodation in Stavanger, my recommendations are:

* Budget: Stavanger Lille Guesthouse and Stavanger Pop Up Hostel.

* Great Value for Money: Stavanger Bed & Breakfast, Scandic Stavanger Park and Radisson Blu Atlantic.

* Luxury: Frogner House Apartments – Nygata 24, Hotel Victoria and Thon Hotel Stavanger.

∗ All the hikes in Norway are at your own risk.

∗ Use appropriate hiking clothes.

∗ Bring enough food, water, maps, and a first aid kit.

* Always check the weather forecast before planning your trip.

* Even if sunshine and fair weather are predicted, it can change quickly. Make sure that you are prepared for changing weather.

* Do not hike if the forecast predicts strong winds, heavy rain, or fog.

* The trail gets very slippery when rains. Use appropriate footwear and hold on to the chains.

∗ There is no cellphone coverage in certain areas.

∗ More information regarding accommodation, transportation and mountain safety can be found at www.visitnorway.com

[3]
Edit
Query
Report
Jean gppva
VENETIAN BLIND INSTALLER
Answer # 3 #

Nordic Choice Hotels – a different hotel company

Thon Hotels – with fantastic breakfast

Radisson Blu Hotels – discover your favourite destinations

Classic Norway Hotels – From distinctive hotels to authentic fisherman's cabins

Citybox – modern and affordable hotels in a central location

DanCenter – your specialist in holiday homes in Norway

[3]
Edit
Query
Report
Hafiz cuft
STATIONARY ENGINEER APPRENTICE
Answer # 4 #

Kjerag is a challenging climb and we had lots of questions around the practicalities of the hike and what it was like to stand on the infamous Kjeragbolten boulder. Now that we’ve done it, we wanted to share the benefits of our experience with you. Here’s our ultimate guide with everything you need to know about climbing Kjerag and standing on Kjeragbolten!

Click here to read about our Kjerag adventures!

Let’s get this straight: climbing Kjerag is difficult! It’s a 9km route with 3 steep ascents all mixed in with lots of climbing on rocks which can be really slippery if it rains. In total, there are around 600 metres of uphill hiking and, at times, it’s steep enough to need to use the guide chains which line the most challenging parts of the route.

Fitness:

I found the third and final climb a bit of a struggle as it seemed to keep giving and giving but overall the hike always felt manageable and I would consider myself to be of average fitness. My marathon running, fitness loving husband found the whole day a breeze!

The steepest parts of the climb are lined with guide chains:

Check out our stats from the day for more detailed information on the hike, timings and elevation:

Most of the route is clearly marked with stone piles which have prominent red T’s painted onto them. The markings are positioned closely enough so that the next marking is visible making it easy enough to find the way. There are also some very pretty signposts that provide reassurance of being on the right path!

Which way? This way!

We arrived in Oslo the morning before our Kjerag climb and made the 7 hour drive to Lysebotn on the same day. Our aim was to stay as close as possible to Kjerag as we wanted to start the hike bright and early the next morning. We opted to pitch our tent at Lysebotn Camping which is a 5 minute drive to the Kjerag car park. It was a little more expensive than other campsites we stayed at during our Norway road trip but the location was perfect and the views of Lysefjord were breathtaking.

We had planned to stay in Flørli 4444 Hostel, a beautiful hostel located right on the shores of Lysefjord with incredible views across the one of Norways most beautiful fjords. The hostel is only accessible by ferry and unfortunately the ferry had not started for the season when we visited so we never made it. This stunning hostel comes highly recommended and is not to be missed on a trip to Lysefjord – Check prices now!

Click here for the best places to stay at Kjerag

After we finished our Kjerag hike we drove to Stavanger and took the ferry to Tau* where we spent the night in Wathne Campsite. Tired, frozen and wet, we treated ourselves to a cabin to thaw out and dry off! The next morning it was a 30 minute drive to Preikestolen where we took on the stunning Pulpit Rock!

*1 day later and the Lysebotn to Songesand ferry was in operation. It runs during the peak tourist season and saves some driving.

A well deserved cabin after Kjerag!

Hiking Pulpit Rock is one of the must do Norway experiences, however the hike is very popular and can get very busy during peak periods. We recommend booking your accommodation well in advance and staying as close to the hike as possible to allow for an early morning or late evening hike to the summit.

Click here for the best places to stay at Pulpit Rock

I’m not the biggest fan of heights and I found Kjerag manageable. The return journey is more difficult as there are lots of steep downhill sections and I was glad to have my awesome hiking buddy to help me along. As soon as I saw the Kjeragbolten boulder I knew stepping out onto it wasn’t an option as I’d potentially get dizzy and take a tumble. Not recommended when 1,000 metre drops are involved!

Downhill views:

The inclines are intense!

What goes up must come down! The steepest climbs:

DON’T LOOK DOWN are probably the best words of advice we can offer! The boulder is accessed by edging around a small ledge and stepping out onto the rock. The step out onto the boulder does involve a small leap of faith but, if it wasn’t for the 1000 metre drop on one side, there would be plenty of room to maneuver!

The most difficult part of Kjeragbolten is stepping around the ledge onto the boulder. The rock itself is quite large and flat so there is a little wiggle room.  We’ve googled this and apparently there have been no falls from the boulder which added to our peace of mind.

Front view of the boulder:

The boulder from above:

Standing on the boulder:

Layers! The altitude makes for very changeable weather and temperatures and we experienced rain, snow, wind and blistering sunshine during our hike! Our gear included:

When it rains, it pours! All wrapped up:

Loving my pink layers!

There are no shops on the climb so bring enough food and drink supplies for the hike! We brought 1.5 litres of water and some sandwiches, crisps and energy bars. For hikes, I am the designated water carrier while Dave takes care of the camera equipment. I used a Camelbak rucksack which holds 1.5 litres of water and has a bite valve at the front to make for easy sharing between the two of us. I don’t even notice I’m carrying it most of the time which can only be a good thing!

Check prices on Amazon

We also brought our cameras and a GoPro to record the action – not forgetting lots of spare batteries and an extra memory card! We didn’t see very many hiking poles on the day we climbed but it did seem like they would be difficult to handle on the steepest parts of the route.

Check out the camera gear we use here

The hike starts from Øygardstøl which is a few minutes drive above Lysebotn. There’s ample parking, a hiking map, toilets, a small information centre and a cafe. We popped into the information centre to check on the hiking conditions and pay for our parking for the day (100 NOK). At the end of the hike we rewarded ourselves with an expensive diet coke in the cafe and soaked in the incredible views of Lysebotn.

Kjerag parking:

The Information Centre:

Route maps:

Check out the views from the cafe:

[1]
Edit
Query
Report
Sohail Jamshedji
BONE CHAR OPERATOR
Answer # 5 #

Kjerag is a seasonal hiking destination. Before the county road between Sirdal and Lysebotn opens around the middle of May, Kjerag is considered to be accessible only to guests with special equipment and accompanied by a tour guide.

[0]
Edit
Query
Report
Nodelman julu Dhirendra
DISPATCHER TUGBOAT
Answer # 6 #

Comment *

Name *

Email *

Website

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Sign me up for the newsletter!

[0]
Edit
Query
Report
El cacxbkj Madhavi
INVENTORY CLERK