What is ideal air fuel ratio?



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The stoichiometric mixture for a gasoline engine is the ideal ratio of air to fuel that burns all fuel with no excess air. For gasoline fuel, the stoichiometric air–fuel mixture is about 14.7:1 i.e. for every one gram of fuel, 14.7 grams of air are required.



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4 


The ideal (theoretical) air-fuel ratio, for a complete combustion, is called stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. For a gasoline (petrol) engine, the stoichiometric air-fuel



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4 


AFR stands for air to fuel ratio. Fuel doesn't burn on its own. It has to be mixed with air. AFR tells you how many parts of air are mixed with each



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2 


The ideal air-fuel ratio that burns all fuel without excess air is 14.7:1. This is referred to as the “stoichiometric” mixture. In this case you have 14.7 parts of air for What is an Air-Fuel Ratio? · Proper Air-Fuel Ratio Under... · Starting Up



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So the mixture having A/F ratio 6:1 is rich and the one having the A/F ratio 20:1 is lean. The ideal mixture is required for the complete combustion



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0 


For gasoline engines, the ideal or stoichiometric A/F ratio is 14.7, which is 14.7 parts of fuel by weight to one part fuel. For E10 gasoline (90 percent gasoline with



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0 


The upper limit consists of around 19-20 parts of air by weight to 1 part of fuel (20:1 - lean mixture). An average 'cruising' operation needs an



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