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what is cyclobenzaprine generic for?

6 Answer(s) Available
Answer # 1 #

Cyclobenzaprine (sold under the brand name Flexeril, among others) is a muscle relaxer used for muscle spasms from musculoskeletal conditions of sudden onset. It is not useful in cerebral palsy. It is taken by mouth. Use is not recommended for more than a few weeks.

Common side effects include headache, feeling tired, dizziness, and dry mouth. Serious side effects may include an irregular heartbeat. There is no evidence of harm in pregnancy, but it has not been well studied in this population. It must not be used with an MAO inhibitor. How it works is unclear.

Cyclobenzaprine was approved for medical use in the United States in 1977. It is available by prescription as a generic medication. In 2020, it was the 39th most commonly prescribed medication in the United States, with more than 16 million prescriptions. It was not available in the United Kingdom as of 2012.

Cyclobenzaprine is used, in conjunction with physical therapy, to treat muscle spasms that occur because of acute musculoskeletal conditions. After sustaining an injury, muscle spasms occur to stabilize the affected body part, which may increase pain to prevent further damage. Cyclobenzaprine is used to treat such muscle spasms associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions. It decreases pain in the first two weeks, peaking in the first few days, but has no proven benefit after two weeks. Since no benefit is proven beyond that, therapy should not be continued long-term. It is the best-studied muscle relaxer. It is not useful for spasticity due to neurologic conditions such as cerebral palsy.

A 2004 review found benefit for fibromyalgia symptoms, with a reported number needed to treat of 4.8 (meaning that 1 person out of every 4.8 benefits from treatment) for pain reduction, but no change in fatigue or tender points. A 2009 Cochrane review found insufficient evidence to justify its use in myofascial pain syndrome. It may also be used along with other treatments for tetanus.

Cyclobenzaprine results in increased rates of drowsiness (38%), dry mouth (24%), and dizziness (10%). Drowsiness and dry mouth appear to intensify with increasing dose. The sedative effects of cyclobenzaprine are likely due to its antagonistic effect on histamine, serotonin, and muscarinic receptors.

Agitation is a common side effect observed, especially in the elderly. Some experts believe that cyclobenzaprine should be avoided in elderly patients because it can cause confusion, delirium, and cognitive impairment. In general, the National Committee for Quality Assurance recommends avoiding the use of cyclobenzaprine in the elderly because of the potential for more severe side effects.

Dysphagia, a life-threatening side-effect, may rarely occur. Treatment protocols and support should follow the same as for any structurally related tricyclic, such as tricyclic antidepressants.

The most common effects of overdose are drowsiness and tachycardia. Rare but potentially critical complications are cardiac arrest, abnormal heart rhythms, severe low blood pressure, seizures, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Life-threatening overdose is rare, however, as the median lethal dose is about 338 milligrams/kilogram in mice and 425 mg/kg in rats. The potential harm is increased when central nervous system depressants and antidepressants are also used; deliberate overdose often includes other drugs.

Cyclobenzaprine has major contraindications with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). At least one study also found increased risk of serotonin syndrome when cyclobenzaprine was taken with the serotonergic drugs duloxetine or phenelzine.

These substances may interact with cyclobenzaprine:

Cyclobenzaprine may affect the medications used in surgical sedation and some surgeons request that patients temporarily discontinue its use prior to surgery.

Cyclobenzaprine is a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Cyclobenzaprine is a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist; it relieves muscle spasm through action on the central nervous system at the brain stem, rather than targeting the peripheral nervous system or muscles themselves.

Cyclobenzaprine has an oral bioavailability of about 55% and approximately 93% is bound to proteins in plasma. The half-life of the drug is 18 hours and it has a plasma clearance of 0.7 litres per minute.

Cyclobenzaprine has been found to be not inferior to tizanidine, orphenadrine, and carisoprodol in the treatment of acute lower back pain, although none have been proven to be effective for long-term use (beyond two weeks of treatment). No differences in pain or spasm scores were noted among these agents, nor when compared to benzodiazepines. However, nonbenzodiazepine (including cyclobenzaprine) treatment was found to have a lower risk of medication abuse and continuation of use against medical advice. Side effects such as sedation and ataxia are also less pronounced with nonbenzodiazepine antispasmodics.

In a study on the treatment of musculoskeletal pain treatment with cyclobenzaprine alone or in combination with ibuprofen, no significant differences in pain scores were noted among the three treatment groups. Peak benefit was found to occur on day seven of the treatment for all groups.

By mouth, cyclobenzaprine is marketed as Apo-Cyclobenzaprin, Fexmid, Flexeril and Novo-Cycloprine. It is available in generic form. A once-a-day, extended-release formulation, Amrix, is available. Cyclobenzaprine is also used by compounding pharmacies in topical creams.

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Nadezhda Darrell
Medical Laboratory Scientist
Answer # 2 #

Generic name: cyclobenzaprine Brand names: Amrix, Comfort Pac with Cyclobenzaprine, Fexmid, Flexeril Drug class: Skeletal muscle relaxants

Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD. Last updated on May 23, 2022.

Cyclobenzaprine is a muscle relaxant. It works by blocking nerve impulses (or pain sensations) that are sent to your brain. Cyclobenzaprine is used together with rest and physical therapy to treat skeletal muscle conditions such as pain or injury.

Cyclobenzaprine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

You should not use cyclobenzaprine if you have an allergy to the medication, a certain type of thyroid disorder (hyperthyroidism), heart block, congestive heart failure, a heart rhythm disorder, or you have recently had a heart attack.

Do not use cyclobenzaprine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

You should not use cyclobenzaprine if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

Cyclobenzaprine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 15 years old.

Do not use cyclobenzaprine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, and tranylcypromine.

Some medicines can interact with cyclobenzaprine and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome. Be sure your doctor knows if you also take stimulant medicine, opioid medicine, herbal products, or medicine for depression, mental illness, Parkinson's disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. Ask your doctor before making any changes in how or when you take your medications.

To make sure cyclobenzaprine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

It is not known whether cyclobenzaprine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It may not be safe to breast-feed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

Cyclobenzaprine is usually taken taken for up to 2 or 3 weeks. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose.

Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

Swallow the capsule whole and do not crush, chew, break, or open it.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 3 weeks, or if they get worse.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of cyclobenzaprine can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include severe drowsiness, vomiting, fast heartbeats, tremors, agitation, or hallucinations.

Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you. Your reactions could be impaired.

Avoid drinking alcohol. Dangerous side effects could occur.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to cyclobenzaprine: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have:

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Serious side effects may be more likely in older adults.

Common cyclobenzaprine side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Using cyclobenzaprine with other drugs that make you drowsy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with cyclobenzaprine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

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Aharon Roja
ROUGH ROUNDER MACHINE
Answer # 3 #

Cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride is approved for use in the United States as a muscle relaxant. It is marketed under the brand names Flexeril® and Amrix® and as generic formulations in 5, 7.5, and 10 mg tablets intended for short-term (2 to 3 week) oral administration.

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Answer # 4 #

This dosage information is for cyclobenzaprine oral tablet. All possible dosages and drug forms may not be included here. Your dosage, drug form, and how often you take the drug will depend on:

Generic: Cyclobenzaprine

Brand: Fexmid

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

5–10 mg taken 3 times per day.

Child dosage (ages 15–17 years)

5–10 mg taken 3 times per day.

Child dosage (ages 0–14 years)

Cyclobenzaprine should not be used in people younger than 15 years.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

The kidneys of older adults may not work as well as they used to. This can cause your body to process drugs more slowly. As a result, more of a drug stays in your body for longer. This raises your risk of side effects. Your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body.

Special dosage considerations

For people with liver problems: If your liver problems are mild, your doctor may start you on a lowered dose or a different dosing schedule. This can help keep levels of this drug from building up too much in your body. You shouldn’t use this drug if your liver problems are moderate or severe.

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Salli Sternin
Scribe
Answer # 5 #

Dosages of Cyclobenzaprine:

Tablet (adult and pediatric)

Capsule, extended-release (adult only)

Dosage Considerations – Should be Given as Follows:

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once daily. Swallow the capsules whole. Do not crush or chew the capsules. Doing so can release all of the drugs at once, increasing the risk of side effects.

This medication is not recommended for use in older adults because they may be at greater risk for side effects while using this drug.

This medication should only be used short-term (for 3 weeks or less) unless directed by your doctor. Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase.

Muscle Spasm

Immediate-release tablet

Extended-release capsule

Dosing Modifications

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Rashmee Dargan
LOG INSPECTOR
Answer # 6 #
  • Baclofen.
  • Methocarbamol.
  • Soma.
  • Zanaflex.
  • Diazepam.
  • Robaxin.
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Kam tdmwfuc Tere
LABORER POULTRY HATCHERY